Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use

Teng-lung Peng [1] , Yu-ting Wong [2]

17 19

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether teachers’ background variables affect teachers’ educational beliefs and different types of computer use. In addition, this study explored the relationship between teachers’ educational beliefs and different types of computer use. The participants in this research were 180 elementary school teachers, including 56 males and 124 females, in central-west Taiwan. A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of collecting relevant information. Moreover, descriptive statistics, factorial analysis, independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA and product-moment correlation were used as the methods of statistical analysis. To understand elementary school teachers’ attitude toward and perception of teachers’ educational beliefs and different types of computer use, the researchers interviewed 18 teachers in the process of collecting the questionnaires as well. The results indicated that teachers’ educational degrees affected teachers’ educational beliefs, while teachers’ educational degrees, teaching years, positions, number of classes, and the frequency of technology integration affected different types of computer use. The results of the questionnaire and interviews demonstrated that teachers’ educational beliefs were correlated with different types of computer use. Based on the findings, some implications are considered to be of help to elementary school teachers and educators.

 

Background variables, Educational beliefs, Computer use
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Primary Language en
Subjects Social Sciences and Humanities
Journal Section Articles
Authors

Author: Teng-lung Peng (Primary Author)
Institution: National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
Country: Taiwan


Author: Yu-ting Wong
Institution: Douliou Elementary School, Taiwan
Country: Taiwan


Bibtex @research article { ijcer428902, journal = {International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research}, issn = {}, eissn = {2148-3868}, address = {Mustafa AYDIN}, year = {}, volume = {5}, pages = {26 - 39}, doi = {}, title = {Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use}, key = {cite}, author = {Wong, Yu-ting and Peng, Teng-lung} }
APA Peng, T , Wong, Y . (). Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use. International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research, 5 (1), 26-39. Retrieved from http://ijcer.net/issue/38043/428902
MLA Peng, T , Wong, Y . "Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use". International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research 5 (): 26-39 <http://ijcer.net/issue/38043/428902>
Chicago Peng, T , Wong, Y . "Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use". International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research 5 (): 26-39
RIS TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use AU - Teng-lung Peng , Yu-ting Wong Y1 - 2018 PY - 2018 N1 - DO - T2 - International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research JF - Journal JO - JOR SP - 26 EP - 39 VL - 5 IS - 1 SN - -2148-3868 M3 - UR - Y2 - 2018 ER -
EndNote %0 International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use %A Teng-lung Peng , Yu-ting Wong %T Effects of Elementary School Teachers’ Background Variables on Their Educational Beliefs and Different Types of Computer Use %D 2018 %J International Journal of Contemporary Educational Research %P -2148-3868 %V 5 %N 1 %R %U